Residents call for plan to reduce Hornby’s traffic woes

Hornby intersections (L to R) Amyes Road and Shands Road, Main South Road, Chalmers Street and Main South Road and Carmen Road and Main South Road.

Hornby’s long-standing transport woes are unlikely to end anytime soon.

The city council confirmed it currently has no projects planned, in spite of residents calling for congestion at peak times to be alleviated.

The Greater Hornby Residents’ Association highlighted the issue in its submission to the Annual Plan, asking the city council to invest more into its roading infrastructure.

Chairman Marc Duff said it wanted to see an acknowledgement from the
city council that Hornby’s
traffic had increased significantly since the February 22, 2011, earthquake and to find out if
there was a plan in place to deal with it.

But a city council spokesman said while there are no specific projects to date, it is monitoring concerns and will develop solutions if required.

“Some of the traffic through Hornby central will drop with the opening of the Christchurch Southern Motorway Stage 2 by the New Zealand Transport Agency,” he said.

A city council spokesman said Hornby had also experienced far less damage to infrastructure compared to other parts of the city.

In 2011, the suburb’s population was 8370. By 2018, it had grown to 9340.

Mr Duff said there is some scepticism as to whether the new motorway will cause traffic in Hornby to drop, as cars travelling in from Rolleston already cut through Springs Rd before linking up to stage one of the motorway.

In the association’s submission to the city council, he highlighted a recent report from The Salvation Army which interviewed Hornby residents.

It said: “Hornby needs help as well as the other side of town
. . . this area is growing too fast. It’s becoming a bottleneck.

“The influx of new residents, businesses and activity since the earthquakes has added greater stress to our roads and surrounding infrastructure.”

Mr Duff’s concern has been backed by residents’ association member Mark Peters, who described roads such as Amyes Rd becoming a “car park” in rush hour.

Chalmers St, Shands Rd, Main South Rd have also been identified as roads needing improvement for congestion.

Daily traffic count figures show Amyes Rd has about 13,600 vehicles a day, Shands Rd 33,400 and Chalmers St to Main South Rd has 3500 vehicles.

Mr Peters said right turning arrows are needed for the intersections of Amyes Rd and Springs Rd, Carmen Rd and Chalmers St and Carmen and Waterloo Rd.

But Halswell-Hornby-Riccarton Community Board chairman Mike Mora said he did not want to see a “knee-jerk” reaction to the problem until the southern motorway opens.

City councillor Jimmy Chen said the extension of the motorway and the South Express Major Cycle Route will be important in helping with the issue.

He said city council staff will also conduct a traffic count and consider installing a speed bump on Waterloo Rd between Carmen and Gilberthorpes Rd.

It is due to concerns from residents about the number of heavy vehicles using the road.

 

2 COMMENTS

  1. Councilors and Council Staff seem to be blind
    1) serious need for turning arrows from all directions at Amyes/Shands and also at the intersection of Chalmers/MainSouth/Goulding. This will help immediately with flow and safety and it doesn’t take a rocket scientist or consultant to see this.

    The Greater Hornby Residents Association is right.. the motorway may not help congestion thats already on Springs, Shands and everywhere between these and out to Halswell. Its certainly busy on all those old narrow country roads on the citys boundary these days… and CCC and Selwyn Council staff are all acting blind.

Comment