Bund to protect homes vulnerable to tidal flooding

AT RISK AREA: Southshore and South New Brighton are vulnerable to tidal flooding.

A bund will be built to protect properties vulnerable to tidal flooding in Southshore and South New Brighton.

The city council agreed to do the work as part of a short-term plan to address flooding issues at its meeting on Tuesday.

The bund will be built in the area from Bridge St to the South Brighton jetty as temporary intervention to reduce the flooding risk south of Bridge St, on the estuary side of Brighton Spit.

Early estimates suggest the construction cost will be between $500,000 and $600,000 but the exact cost will not be known until the detailed design work is done.

The city council has decided to defer consideration of extending the bund from the yacht club to the Jellicoe Marsh boardwalk until it has received the revised coastal hazards assessment report from Tonkin & Taylor and considered the regeneration strategy for the Southshore and South New Brighton area.

City council Land Drainage Manager Keith Davison says building a bund from Bridge Street to the South Brighton jetty should ease the flooding risk for a significant number of residential properties.

“The bund will provide a degree of protection for residents living in the area while we work through the longer term solutions,’’ Mr Davison said.

The risk of flooding in Southshore has been in the spotlight since July when heavy rain, coupled with a record high tide and storm surge, saw water top the estuary edge and flow through gaps in a grassed embankment created by Land Information New Zealand on red zoned land.

Some streets, garages and gardens in the area subsequently flooded, along with two homes.

The city council took emergency steps to protect vulnerable areas from the next high tide by raising the level of the embankment and building a bund. It has subsequently decided to spend about $1 million on stabilising the emergency bund to give it a design life of up to 20 years and allow time for planning and decisions on long-term options for the area.

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